Tracing the Rain: Can Measuring Evaporation Help Farmers?

Accurately capturing a raindrop’s journey to the ground is tricky business. Evaporation can cause a raindrop to shrink between the time it is captured by radar in a cloud and when it hits a farmer’s field, and this can make it hard to rely on radar-based rainfall estimations in some areas. Researchers from the University of Missouri in Columbia are taking a closer look at evaporation. With the use of specialized weather algorithms ...

All Water Is Connected: Citizen Scientists Monitor Virginia Water Quality (PDF)

When we visit the beach, water quality is the last thing most of us want to worry about. Virginia Beach receives more than 15 million tourists each year, and both the state Department of Health and a local branch of the Surfrider Foundation are checking water quality to make sure visiting beachgoers and locals alike are safe. Surfrider is a nonprofit that works to protect oceans and beaches, and its Blue Water Task Forces (BWTF) conduct local water testing to augment government data collection.

The Power of the Hive: New Climate Fund Centers Southern Women of Color (PDF in new tab)

The new Hive Fund for Climate and Gender Justice seeks to catalyze a deeply rooted climate response in the South by centering the leadership of black, Indigenous and other women of color. Southern women of color have a long track record of advancing social justice. They also play a pivotal role in grassroots environmental movements in the U.S. (and Global) South, leading groups that are often overlooked by grantmakers in favor of larger, more institutional, white- and male-led nonprofits.

Rechargeable Water-based Grid Battery Could Store Wind and Solar Power | Technology

Researchers in the lab of Stanford Materials Scientist Yi Cui have created a water-based chemical reaction-battery that is able to store power for later use, and it may serve as a helpful grid solution in balancing out the volatility of renewable energy sources like wind and solar. With an affordable, rechargeable battery like the one this team of scientists is developing, excess solar and wind power can be saved up for when the weather isn’t providing energy or when electricity demand is high.

Behind a Search for Breakthrough Ideas to Capture River Plastic Before It Reaches the Ocean

An estimated 8 million tons of plastic enter the ocean each year. As plastic becomes part of oceanic food chains and the Earth’s water cycle, organisms die off and particles contaminate rain, tap water, food and human bodily waste. The severity of this problem is now more widely recognized, and some companies, states and countries are adjusting plastic regulations.

8 Amazing Early Women Aviators

There have been countless female aviators since 1903, when Aida de Acosta, at 19, took the women’s first solo flight on a dirigible in Paris. This article cannot attempt to honor them all. But in celebration of Women’s History Month, and also Women in Aviation Worldwide Week (March 7–13), let’s look at a few shining stars of female flight. De Laroche was the first woman to receive a pilot’s license in France in 1910. She was the daughter of a plumber, and was a gifted actress, balloonist, engin

Apache, Comanche Win in Federal Court: Company Ordered to Remove Oil Pipeline and Vacate

(EnviroNews USA Headline News Desk) — Cado County, Oklahoma — On March 28, 2017, a federal judge in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma ordered the natural gas pipeline company Enable Midstream Partners (Enable) to remove a pipeline running through tribal lands. The land in Caddo County is held in trust by the federal government for members of the Kiowa, Comanche, Apache, Caddo and Cherokee tribes.

To Protect a Critical Forest in Appalachia, a Foundation Goes Beyond Grantmaking — Inside Philanthropy

While the coal industry continues to decline, the communities and lands of Appalachia are in transition. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and its funders are playing a significant role in reimagining coal country. In the spring and summer of 2019, TNC acquired 253,000 acres of land in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, which it will place under sustainable forestry management as the Cumberland Forest Project. A $20 million loan in the form of a program-related investment (PRI) from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) played a big role in this land purchase.

Why Men Got Picked Over Women in a Blind Review of Science Grants

A recent study of a science grant application process at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation found male applicants received higher scores than women, even in a blind review. At the foundation’s request, a team from the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research analyzed this imbalance and reported that factors like scientific discipline and position, publication record, and grant history were not factors — the main difference was in the language used in proposal titles and descriptions.

How You Can Help Combat Climate Change

Advice from a fellow of Royal Society on how we, as a society and as individuals, can help the climate recover. England’s Royal Society, the national academy founded on November 28, 1660, is still churning out loads of scientific excellence. In this blog, a current fellow shares how we can all help combat climate change. On November 28, 1660, English scientist Christopher Wren spoke at Gresham College in Central London, launching what is now the Royal Society, the U.K.’s independent national science academy.
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